Event Detail

Event Type: 
Applied Mathematics and Computation Seminar
Date/Time: 
Friday, November 6, 2009 - 04:00
Location: 
GLK 113

Speaker Info

Institution: 
University of Texas at El-Paso
Abstract: 

Recent experimental studies of downward migration of polydisperse,
micron-sized particles in porous media revealed that the classical
colloid filtration theory fails to adequately predict irreversibly
attached particle concentrations. This failure stems from an observed
non-linear decrease
in the irreversible particle attachment with transport distance. Here we
present
a theoretical analysis based on particle size distribution that captures
the
key features of these experimental results. We find that irreversible
attachment
rates are influenced by the surface area of particles rather than mass
or volume, as expressed by a strong correlation between the irreversible
attachment
rate and the radius of the particles squared. Our analysis reveals
that a small fraction (less than four percent) of the poly-disperse
particle population
is responsible for a decrease in the average irreversible attachment
with transport distance. These particles have a larger average diameter
than
the rest of the population and, consequently, a higher than average
irreversible
attachment rate. Hence, the dependence of irreversible particle
attachment
on transport distance is a consequence of the non-uniformity of the
particle
sizes.